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Update on Dontrelle’s knee

Dontrelle Willis had his right knee examined by Dr. Steven Lemos as well as an MRI and the diagnosis is patellar tendinitis. Willis was given a cortisone injection to reduce inflammation and he was fitted for a brace to provide additional support. He will return to Lakeland later this week to resume his program.

Patellar tendinitis is commonly referred to as jumper’s knee. According to MayoClinic.com it results from overuse in that small tears develop in the tendons and the body can’t repair them quick enough. The primary treatment is rest and conservative therapy. While the cortisone shot should help with pain, it doesn’t help with the healing process and could weaken the tendon.

Posted by on July 8, 2008.

Tags:

Categories: 2008 Season, Injuries

2 Responses

  1. I did hear that Dontrelle was jumping around on the mound a lot.

    by Sean C. in Illinois on Jul 8, 2008 at 5:00 pm

  2. Good news, for certain. Time to let Dontrelle R & R for a couple weeks, and then get him back on his rehab program…

    In fact, I think all of this is good news. It suggests that Dontrelle’s control problems and composure on the mound may — MAY — be traceable to a relatively unremarkable injury which, if given time to heal, could clear up without long-term issues.

    That’s the optimist in me. I wouldn’t bet on it, but that’s what I hope for.

    He’s such a good guy, I want the best outcome for him. I ain’t afraid to say it: I’ve been a fan of his since he burst on the scene. I’m still excited about the possibilities for him in a Tiger uniform.

    by scotsw on Jul 9, 2008 at 11:00 am

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