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The Bonderman Elbow Saga Takes a Positive Turn

Yes he’s still injured, but at least it isn’t the dreaded UCL injury, and it’s not even the surgically fixable bone chips. Instead everything is intact mechanically and it is diagnosed as elbow inflammation – meaning R & R should resolve it in the short term, though he probably is done for the season. The fact that this has been a recurring injury the last 3 years though means it is something to watch for, and also something the Tigers and Bonderman need to learn how to deal with.

It also appears the Tigers are going to take a look at how the players and organization communicate about injuries:

Leyland said the organization will review the process by which players report health issues and how the team documents them. He has no problem with the way the medical staff handled it, he said, but he wants his players to be up-front and honest when they’re not feeling right.

“If there’s a sign,” Leyland said, “we want to know about the first minor sign of anything.”

It’s a catch-22, Leyland said, because a sign of an injury could turn out to be a meaningless injury. But they want to get players to at least trust that the club won’t overreact. As Leyland put it, he’s not a mind-reader.

Jeremy Bonderman also explained his mindset, and it became understandable why he thought he could tough it out:

“People can criticize if they want,” he said. “I understand where they’re coming from, but my belief is if you don’t go out and try, you never know. I wanted to find out how bad it was. I thought if I could go out and help my team win, that I could keep going.

“I didn’t tell anybody how bad I was. Maybe I didn’t do the smartest thing in the world, but they gave me a [long-term] contract [last offseason] and they believed in me to go out and pitch.”

The Official Site of The Detroit Tigers: News: Detroit Tigers News

Posted by on September 10, 2007.

Categories: 2007 Season, Injuries

7 Responses

  1. Leyland said the organization will review the process by which players report health issues and how the team documents them. He has no problem with the way the medical staff handled it, he said, but he wants his players to be up-front and honest when they’re not feeling right.

    “If there’s a sign,” Leyland said, “we want to know about the first minor sign of anything.”

    I think this is a very interesting comment and one which deserves some careful study: it ( to me ) indicates an underlying problem — one which some of us had expressed a concern for already — and that being that the Tiger coaching my not be “in tune” — if I can put it that way — well enough with the players

    if Leyland is right in looking at this like he’s saying I think there is a good chance we have picked up on something that can be improved and which could result in a surprising improvement in play

    I’m just a fan though, not a coach or manager, so this is just my fan comments,

    by Bill A \ Kal MI on Sep 11, 2007 at 8:55 am

  2. I don’t care who’s coaching, Jeremy Bonderman is not disclosing how bad his arm hurts before what’s turned out to probably be his last start of the year. And that’s a fact. You give a kid who’s extremely competitive a big contract and pay him to pitch and try to win games he’s going to do just that — through pain. That’s why they’re professional athletes — their competitive drive is higher then most others coupled with immense talents.

    by Mike R on Sep 12, 2007 at 3:30 am

  3. If Bondo didn’t want to go out there with his arm hurting a little, would we want him? It’s a fine line and takes experience to know how much is too much. Sometimes going out there is best for the team, sometimes sitting down is.

    by MSL on Sep 12, 2007 at 6:57 am

  4. Athletes play through little pains all the time. It’s hard to know ahead of time which ones will have an adverse effect, and which will not. I think it’s a little totalitarian to expect players to report every little thing – the overhead would be enormous. If we applied an over-caution philosophy to every situation, Curt Shilling would not have pitched that W.S. gem with the bloody sock.

    I will refrain from placing blame. Even through his struggles he had normal velocity and “sliderocity.” I’m sure he felt he was physically able to perform his role.

    It’s a shame Bondo is hurt, but we don’t need to call for any heads on platters.

    by Coach Jim on Sep 12, 2007 at 10:11 am

  5. The only positive turn this story could have taken is if Bondo’s arm actually fell off.. He’s a bum and has been since he’s been with us..

    by Jon on Sep 12, 2007 at 2:34 pm

  6. The only positive turn this story could have taken is if Bondo’s arm actually fell off.. He’s a bum and has been since he’s been with us..

    This might just be the worst comment this year.

    by billfer on Sep 13, 2007 at 8:16 am

  7. Jon:

    Let me guess…. Bonderman beat you out for the last spot on the high-school baseball team AND stole your girlfriend AND beat you up in the parking lot when you tried to defend your manhood, which compromised your esteem, growth, and lifecourse immeasurably. What was a promising and lucrative baseball career spiraled down to the assitant to the head-janitor position you now hold for the Pasco High School. Just think, if it wasn’t for Bondo, ya coulda been a contender…

    Seriously though — have you followed this guy at all as a Tiger? Yes, he’s been dubious since the All Star break, yes he’s stunk his last few starts. But that hardly justifies the scope of your comment.

    by T Smith on Sep 13, 2007 at 9:48 am

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